Amerika Forum - USA 4 ALL - Informatie

Amerika forum door USA4ALL!

Amerika Vakantie Routes en hulp bij uw planning. Uiteraard kunt u hier ook terecht voor andere Amerikaans gerelateerde vragen over de Verenigde Staten van Amerika!
Als u zich registreert als lid, ziet u minder advertenties! Bovendien ziet u meer onderwerpen, zoals bijv. voorgestelde routeopties en krijgt u toegang tot de veel gestelde vragen. Bij aanmelding heeft u geen last meer van dit bericht.

Troy Davis

Discussie gestart

Johan

Hier overigens een erg triest verhaal over een ter dood veroordeelde die met een beetje pech morgen de injectie krijgt!



The Georgia Board of Pardons and Parole has denied clemency for death-row inmate Troy Davis.
Davis was convicted of the 1989 killing of Savannah, Georgia, police officer Mark MacPhail.
Davis is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection at 7 p.m. Wednesday at a state prison in Jackson, Georgia.

Since Davis' conviction in 1991, seven of the nine witnesses against him have recanted or contradicted their testimony. There also have been questions about the physical evidence - and, according to some, the lack thereof - linking Davis to the killing.

Amnesty International was among the organizations appealing for clemency for Davis.

"It is unconscionable that the Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles has denied relief to Troy Davis. Allowing a man to be sent to death under an enormous cloud of doubt about his guilt is an outrageous affront to justice," Amnesty International said in a statement Tuesday.

"Should Troy Davis be executed, Georgia may well have executed an innocent man and in so doing discredited the justice system," the statement said.

But the victim's mother, Anne MacPhail, said she's satisfied that Davis will be executed.

"Well, justice is done, that's the way we look at it. That's what we wanted," the mother told CNN. "I am very convinced that he is guilty."

She said she would not attend Davis' execution but family members would be there.

Anne MacPhail said she has not forgiven the convicted of killing her son.

"Not yet, maybe sometime," she said.

The NAACP and Georgians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty had joined Amnesty International in organizing support for Davis, setting up about 300 rallies, vigils and events worldwide in the past week or so. In addition, they said that more than 1 million people have signed a petition in support of Davis' bid to be exonerated.

In a 2008 statement, then-Chatham County District Attorney Spencer Lawton described how Davis was at a pool party in Savannah when he shot another man, Michael Cooper, wounding him in the face. Davis was then driven to a nearby convenience store, where he pistol-whipped a homeless man, Larry Young, who'd just bought a beer.

Soon thereafter, prosecutors said, MacPhail - who was working in uniform, off-duty, at a nearby bus station and restaurant - arrived. It was then, the jury determined, that Davis shot the officer three times, including once in the face as he stood over him.

Davis' lawyers, in a federal court filing, insisted that there is "no physical evidence linking" Davis to MacPhail's murder. They point, too, to "the unremarkable conclusion" of a ballistics expert who testified that he could not find definitively that the bullets that wounded Cooper and killed MacPhail were the same.

Georgia's attorney general, in an online statement, claimed that the expert said the bullets came from the same gun type and noted that casings at the pool party shooting matched - thus came from the same firearm as - those found at MacPhail's murder scene.

Two decades ago, a jury convicted Davis on two counts of aggravated assault and one each of possessing a firearm during a crime, obstructing a law enforcement officer and murder. The latter charge led, soon thereafter, to his death sentence.

While reviewing Davis' claims of innocence last year, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Georgia found that Davis "vastly overstates the value of his evidence of innocence."

"Some of the evidence is not credible and would be disregarded by a reasonable juror," Judge William T. Moore wrote in a 172-page opinion. "Other evidence that Mr. Davis brought forward is too general to provide anything more than smoke and mirrors."

The parole board denied had denied Davis clemency once before. The board has never changed its mind on any case in the past 33 years.
#1 - 20-09-2011, 16:51 uur

Pieter79

Eindelijk gerechtigheid voor de politieman die 2 kleine kinderen en een vrouw achter moest laten door toedoen van dit beest. Hier het plaatselijke krantenartikel van toendertijd: http://multimedia.savannahnow.com/media/DavisMcPhail/1989/198908AUG21SUSPECT%28EP%29.pdf
Davis had eerder op die dag al iemand met het vuurwapen in het gezicht geschoten en was na het koelbloedig vermoorden van een politie officer op de vlucht. Hij was nergens te vinden.

Sorry Johan, maar dit is de andere kant van het verhaal.

Gr. Pieter
#2 - 21-09-2011, 00:10 uur
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."
Inventor ***7 Patents Granted*** (Update Jul-2019)

Johan

Je impliceert dat gerechtigdheid dient wanneer een mogelijk onschuldig burger ter dood wordt veroordeeld! En ik zeg met nadruk MOGELIJK! Ik denk dat daar geen sprake van is of hoeft te zijn. Ik weet overigens niet of de man al dan niet onschuldig is! Feit is echter dat er zeer gerede twijfel is bij een aantal zaken die zijn veroordeling teweeg hebben gebracht! Ik zeg ook niet dat het een lieverdje is!

Ook hier weer vind ik de waarheid belangrijker dan de straf Pieter! Waarbij ik overigens van mening ben dat de dader, of die nu Troy Davis of anders heet, de doodstraf mag hebben!

http://www.amnestyusa.org/our-work/cases/usa-troy-davis

#3 - 21-09-2011, 03:57 uur

Johan

Van de 9 ooggetuigen zijn er 7 die hun verklaring hebben gewijzigd en de meeste hebben verklaard door de politie onder druk te zijn gezet, van de 2 overgebleven getuigen is er 1 mogelijk zelf de dader, zeker 3 van de toenmalige juryleden geven aan dat ze anders hadden beslist met wat ze nu weten, vooraanstaande voorvechters van de doodstraf hebben in deze zaak getracht de executie te voorkomen en zo meerderen! Toch is Troy Davis gisteravond om het leven gebracht en ondanks alle twijfel die is ontstaan omtrent deze zaak.

Wat een grote schande voor dit land!




JACKSON, Ga. -- Troy Davis, convicted of murdering an off-duty Savannah police officer more than 20 years ago, held fast to his claims of innocence even as he was finally executed by lethal injection on Wednesday night.

Strapped to a gurney and minutes from death, Davis stated that he had not carried a gun the night of the murder and did not shoot the officer, Mark MacPhail, in a fast food restaurant parking lot on an August night in 1989.

Speaking directly to MacPhail's brother and son, who witnessed the execution, Davis beseeched them to continue to examine the events that night. "All I can ask is that you look deep into this case so you can really find the truth," he said.

Davis then addressed prison officials preparing to inject him with a lethal mix of chemicals. "May God have mercy on your souls," he said.

The first injection began at 10:54 p.m. and Davis was declared dead at 11:08 p.m. Afterward, Davis' attorneys and legal advocates quickly decried the execution as a terrible miscarriage of justice.

"I had the unfortunate opportunity tonight to witness a tragedy, to witness Georgia execute an innocent man," Jason Ewart, one of Davis' attorneys, said outside the prison. "The innocent have no enemy but time, and Troy's time slipped away tonight."

Meanwhile, family members of the murdered officer expressed relief that the execution was over, according to the Associated Press.

News of the execution quieted hundreds of protesters who had lined the highway across from the entrance to the prison for hours, chanting and singing as they faced a small army of baton-wielding prison guards in full riot gear, sheriff's deputies and state police. The crowd of protesters was quickly dispersed by police after Davis' death was announced.

Local observers called the protests the largest at the state's death row in many years. "I've never seen anything like this," said Don Earnhart, manager of a Jackson, Ga., radio station, who said he has covered executions for several decades. Protests were also seen at the state capitol, Athens, in Washington, D.C. and at the U.S. embassy in London.

The execution was delayed for more than four hours by a last-minute petition to the U.S. Supreme Court by Davis' legal team. The justices denied the petition without comment or dissent.

Davis' death ends an extraordinary legal saga that included three last-minute stays of execution and dozens of hearings before state and federal appellate courts. Over two decades, his legal team argued that a lack of physical evidence linking Davis to the crime and recantations by a number of critical eyewitnesses who originally implicated him in the shooting were reason enough for the Georgia courts to grant him a new trial.

But state and federal courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, repeatedly ruled against his appeals for a new trial and he was ultimately executed on the basis of the original jury verdict.

On Tuesday, the Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles, which has sole authority to commute a death sentence in the state, rejected Davis' plea for clemency, essentially sealing his fate. MacPhail's family members had repeatedly stated their certainty that Davis was guilty of the crime and consistently fought his efforts to obtain clemency.

Earlier this week, the state's pardons board was bombarded by hundreds of thousands of petitions to spare Davis' life, including ones from William S. Sessions, a former FBI director, and Bob Barr, a four-term Republican congressman from Georgia and death penalty supporter. Many of those opposed to the execution noted the lack of physical evidence tying Davis to the crime and the recantation of eyewitness, many of whom told attorneys for Davis that they had been pressured by police to testify that Davis was the shooter.

"Imposing an irreversible sentence of death on the skimpiest of evidence will not serve the interest of justice," Barr wrote in an editorial on the case last Wednesday.

On Wednesday morning, Davis offered to submit to a lie detector test, but the request was denied by prison officials.

As the hours until the execution dwindled, calls for clemency continued from around the nation and the world, including from a group of former death row wardens, who wrote to Georgia authorities calling on them to halt the death sentence due to doubts about Davis' guilt. Among the group was the former warden in charge of the Georgia death chamber.

"While most of the prisoners whose executions we participated in accepted responsibility for the crimes for which they were punished, some of us have also executed prisoners who maintained their innocence until the end," the wardens wrote. "It is those cases that are most haunting to an executioner."

Meanwhile, the family of the murdered policeman, Mark MacPhail, and the case's original prosecutor have argued strenuously for Davis' execution, and have asserted that there is no doubt that he is guilty of the murder.

Joan MacPhail-Harris, the officer's widow, said this week that Davis "has had ample time to prove his innocence" and failed to do so, according to the Associated Press. She, along with MacPhail's children, urged the pardon's board to deny Davis' petition for clemency this week.

An extraordinary hearing last year ordered by the U.S. Supreme Court gave Davis the rare opportunity to present evidence of his innocence as part of a petition for a new trial. The judge overseeing the hearing ruled that the state's case against Davis "may not be ironclad" and agreed that Davis had raised some doubts about his conviction. However, the judge concluded that Davis had not provided the court with compelling evidence of his innocence and denied his request for a retrial.

Supporters of Davis said the unwillingness of the U.S. justice system to reconsider his death sentence in light of the witness recantations and other new evidence exposed fundamental problems in the justice system.

"Troy Davis has become an incredible symbol of everything that is broken, everything that is wrong" with the capital punishment in the U.S., said Larry Cox, executive director of Amnesty International's U.S. branch, in an interview on the prison grounds.

Jason Ewart, Davis attorney, said he hoped Davis death would lead to systematic reform.

"This case struck a chord in the world, and as a result the legacy of Troy Davis doesn't die tonight," Ewart said, standing beside Davis' family members outside Georgia's death row.

"Our sadness, the sadness of his friends and his family, is tempered by the hope that Troy's death will lead to fundamental legal reforms," he said, "so we will never again witness, with inevitable regret, the execution of an innocent man as we did here tonight."
#4 - 22-09-2011, 13:13 uur
« Laatst bewerkt op: 22-09-2011, 13:42 uur door Johan »

Pieter79

Waar was Amnesty International toen dit beest geexecuteerd werd, op dezelfde dag als Troy Davis:
Lawrence Brewer Wikipedia

Lawrence Brewer

Ik ben blij dat deze beesten niet meer onder ons zijn... justice for all!!

Gr. Pieter
#5 - 22-09-2011, 21:51 uur
« Laatst bewerkt op: 22-09-2011, 21:54 uur door Pieter79 »
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."
Inventor ***7 Patents Granted*** (Update Jul-2019)

Johan

Je vergelijkingen slaan kant nog wal maar iedereen mag daarin een eigen opinie hebben uiteraard!
Ik ben bijzonder blij dat ik de jouwe niet deel, alhoewel eentje wel: Lawrence Brewer.
#6 - 22-09-2011, 22:36 uur

Karina

Ik heb begin dit jaar een boek van John Grisham gelezen over een terdoodveroordeelde. Het heet 'The Confession'  . Absoluut een aanrader. Ik heb ' m in een adem uitgelezen. Ik deel ook weleens de nogal basale emotie van dat iemand het niet meer verdient om te leven als hij een vreselijke misdaad heeft begaan zoals moord. Zeker als het om een kind gaat. Ik zal ook niet voor mijzelf instaan als, God verhoede, iemand mijn dochter iets aan zou doen. En zoals mijn man altijd zegt (Amerikaan). De familieleden van de slachtoffers hebben levenslang. Zij zijn hun broer, zus, vader, moeder noem het maar kwijt, voor altijd. Ouders zullen nooit kleinkinderen krijgen van hun vermoorde kind. Ik noem maar iets. Het is zo ingrijpend. Toch moet je er wel heeeel voorzichtig mee omgaan. Helaas is ook niet een rechtssysteem perfect. Het blijft allemaal mensenwerk, en er kunnen fouten worden gemaakt.  En het boek van John Grisham laat dat weer eens zien. Is en blijf een moeilijke kwestie.
#7 - 01-11-2011, 13:12 uur

Karina

Ik heb begin dit jaar een boek van John Grisham gelezen over een terdoodveroordeelde. Het heet 'The Confession'  . Absoluut een aanrader. Ik heb ' m in een adem uitgelezen. Ik deel ook weleens de nogal basale emotie van dat iemand het niet meer verdient om te leven als hij een vreselijke misdaad heeft begaan zoals moord. Zeker als het om een kind gaat. Ik zal ook niet voor mijzelf instaan als, God verhoede, iemand mijn dochter iets aan zou doen. En zoals mijn man altijd zegt (Amerikaan). De familieleden van de slachtoffers hebben levenslang. Zij zijn hun broer, zus, vader, moeder noem het maar kwijt, voor altijd. Ouders zullen nooit kleinkinderen krijgen van hun vermoorde kind. Ik noem maar iets. Het is zo ingrijpend. Toch moet je er wel heeeel voorzichtig mee omgaan. Helaas is ook niet een rechtssysteem perfect. Het blijft allemaal mensenwerk, en er kunnen fouten worden gemaakt.  En het boek van John Grisham laat dat weer eens zien. Is en blijf een moeilijke kwestie.
 
#8 - 01-11-2011, 13:13 uur

Johan

Je mag nooit je ogen sluiten voor de slachtoffers en zeker nooit voor de achterblijvers daarvan, die hebben inderdaad levenslang. Alleen daar al om zou ik sowieso liever iemand levenslang opgesloten zien. Een levenslange opsluiting doet in mijn opinie veel meer recht aan de slachtoffers dan de doodstraf. Geloof me het is geen pretje als je levenslang krijgt. De doodstraf ruimt niet alleen de dader op maar daarmee ook het probleem van diezelfde dader. Hij/zij voelt er niets meer van als de injectie is geplaatst. Ook naar de kosten gekeken is het een zinvollere oplossing, iemand levenslang opsluiten is over het algemeen goedkoper dan de doodstraf uitvoeren, inclusief de gepaard gaande kosten voor de rechtsgang.
#9 - 01-11-2011, 13:35 uur

thieske

Ik ben tegen capital punishment, gewoon omdat een rechtssysteem niet foutloos is. Buiten beschouwing latende of deze knakker schuldig is of niet. Ik hoop dan ook dat er in de niet al te verre toekomst een moratorium komt ten aanzien van doodstraffen. Ze zijn als barbaars als de daders zelf, in een wereld waarin we streven naar meer harmonie, vrede en betere leefomstandigheden moet je beginnen bij jezelf en hoe jij anderen behandeld. Iemand die iets gedaan heeft met een mogelijke doodstraf tot gevolg, die sluit je eenzaam en levenslang op.
#10 - 02-11-2011, 07:35 uur
« Laatst bewerkt op: 02-11-2011, 07:40 uur door thieske »
For Boston, For Boston, We sing our proud refrain

Pieter79

...ten aanzien van doodstraffen. Ze zijn als barbaars als de daders zelf, in een wereld waarin we streven naar meer harmonie, vrede en betere leefomstandigheden moet je beginnen bij jezelf en hoe jij anderen behandeld. Iemand die iets gedaan heeft met een mogelijke doodstraf tot gevolg, die sluit je eenzaam en levenslang op.

Misschien is die eenzame en levenslange opsluiting wel barbaarser dan de doodstraf zelf. Iemand die levenslang wordt opgesloten, onterecht, dat is net zo fout als iemand die onterecht de doodstraf krijgt.

Ik heb geen genade voor diegenen die een moord e.d. begaan. Deze parasieten moeten verwijderd worden uit de samenleving, en dat risico weten ze dat ze lopen op het moment dat ze de fout in gaan.

Dat levenslang zogenaamd duurder is dan de doodstraf is natuurlijk bulls**t. Dit komt vooral door juridische kosten; waarom is dit meer voor iemand die de doodstraf krijgt dan iemand die een levenslange opsluiting krijgt. Is er minder overleg of minder mogelijkheden om in beroep te gaan tegen levenslange opsluiting dan de doodstraf. Als het zo is dan moet dit systeem op de schop. Verder maakt het mij niet heel veel uit wat goedkoper is zolang die parasieten maar niet meer eten en onderdak hoeft worden te geven.

Gr. Pieter
#11 - 02-11-2011, 14:45 uur
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."
Inventor ***7 Patents Granted*** (Update Jul-2019)

Johan

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29552692/ns/us_news-crime_and_courts/t/execute-or-not-question-cost/#.TrFxinKyBw0

Succes met het lezen van de bullshit!

En dan nog een stukje voor je met nog wat extra bullshit: (onderaan staan de bronnen zodat je ook zeker weet dat het niet bij elkaar verzonnen is)

The High Cost of the Death Penalty

The death penalty is much more expensive than life without parole because the Constitution requires a long and complex judicial process for capital cases. This process is needed in order to ensure that innocent men and woman are not executed for crimes they did not commit, and even with these protections the risk of executing an innocent person can not be completely eliminated.

If the death penalty was replaced with a sentence of Life Without the Possibility of Parole*, which costs millions less and also ensures that the public is protected while eliminating the risk of an irreversible mistake, the money saved could be spent on programs that actually improve the communities in which we live. The millions of dollars in savings could be spent on: education, roads, police officers and public safety programs, after-school programs, drug and alcohol treatment, child abuse prevention programs, mental health services, and services for crime victims and their families.

*More than 3500 men and woman have received this sentence in California since 1978 and NOT ONE has been released, except those few individuals who were able to prove their innocence.

California could save $1 billion over five years by replacing the death penalty with permanent imprisonment.

California taxpayers pay $90,000 more per death row prisoner each year than on prisoners in regular confinement.
California Cost Studies:


Report of the California Commission on the Fair Administration of Justice (2008)

"The additional cost of confining an inmate to death row, as compared to the maximum security prisons where those sentenced to life without possibility of parole ordinarily serve their sentences, is $90,000 per year per inmate. With California's current death row population of 670, that accounts for $63.3 million annually."

Using conservative rough projections, the Commission estimates the annual costs of the present (death penalty) system to be $137 million per year.

The cost of the present system with reforms recommended by the Commission to ensure a fair process would be $232.7 million per year.

The cost of a system in which the number of death-eligible crimes was significantly narrowed would be $130 million per year.

The cost of a system which imposes a maximum penalty of lifetime incarceration instead of the death penalty would be $11.5 million per year.

Commission on the Fair Administration of Justice (June 30, 2008)



ACLU of Northern California's Report "The Hidden Death Tax" (2008)
In "The Hidden Death Tax" the ACLU-NC reveals for the first time some of the hidden costs of California's death penalty, based on records of actual trial expenses and state budgets.

The report reveals that:

    California taxpayers pay at least $117 million each year post-trial seeking execution of the people currently on death row;

    Executing all of the people currently on death row, or waiting for them to die there of other causes, will cost California an estimated $4 billion more than if they had been sentenced to die in prison of disease, injury, or old age;

    California death penalty trials have cost as much as $10.9 million.

Conclusion:
The report concludes that not enough is being done to track death penalty expenses. The report recommends tracking more of these costs to provide greater transparency and accountability for a system that costs California hundreds of millions. Finally, this report demonstrate that California's death penalty is arbitrary, unnecessary and a waste of critical resources.
Read the report.



Los Angeles Times Study Finds California Spends $250 Million per Execution (2005)

Key Points:

    The California death penalty system costs taxpayers more than $114 million a year beyond the cost of simply keeping the convicts locked up for life. (This figure does not take into account additional court costs for post-conviction hearings in state and federal courts, estimated to exceed several million dollars.)

    With 11 executions spread over 27 years, on a per execution basis, California and federal taxpayers have paid more than $250 million for each execution.

    It costs approximately $90,000 more a year to house an inmate on death row, than in the general prison population or $57.5 million annually.

    The Attorney General devotes about 15% of his budget, or $11 million annually to death penalty cases.

    The California Supreme Court spends $11.8 million on appointed counsel for death row inmates.

    The Office of the State Public Defender and the Habeas Corpus Resource Center spend a total of $22.3 million on defense for indigent defendants facing death.

    The federal court system spends approximately $12 million on defending death row inmates in federal court.

    No figures were given for the amount spent by the offices of County District Attorneys on the prosecution of capital cases, however these expenses are presumed to be in the tens of millions of dollars each year.

Source: Tempest, Rone, "Death Row Often Means a Long Life", Los Angeles Times, March 6, 2005. Read the article.


Study Finds Death Penalty More Expensive Than Sentence of Life Without Parole. (1993)

Capital Trials Are Different

Capital punishment in California, as in every other state, is more expensive than a life imprisonment sentence without the opportunity of parole. These costs are not the result of frivolous appeals but rather the result of Constitutionally mandated safeguards that can be summarized as follows:

    Juries must be given clear guidelines on sentencing, which result in explicit provisions for what constitutes aggravating and mitigating circumstances.

    Defendants must have a dual trial--one to establish guilt or innocence and if guilty a second trial to determine whether or not they would get the death penalty.

    Defendants sentenced to death are granted oversight protection in an automatic appeal to the state supreme court.

Constitutional Safeguards

Since there are few defendants who will plead guilty to a capital charge, virtually every death penalty trial becomes a jury trial with all of the following elements:

    a more extensive jury selection procedure

    a four fold increase in the number of motions filed

    a longer, dual trial process

    more investigators and expert testimony

    more lawyers specializing in death penalty litigation

    automatic, mandatory appeals

Conclusions

This study concludes that the enhanced cost of trying a death penalty case is at least $1.25 million more than trying a comparable murder case resulting in a sentence of life in prison without parole. These savings are entirely at the trial level and do not take into consideration the cost to county taxpayers (as they share the burden with other California citizens) for the mandatory state supreme court appeals and potential federal appeals.

Source:

This study titled "Capital Punishment at What Price: An Analysis of the Cost Issue in a Strategy to Abolish the Death Penalty" was completed by David Erickson in 1993 in the form of a Master's Thesis for U.C. Berkeley's Graduate School of Public Policy. The complete study can be found in the U.C. Berkeley Graduate Library or can be obtained by contacting Death Penalty Focus.
Read the full study.



Cost Study by the Sacramento Bee (1988)

Key Points:

    A study done by the Sacramento Bee (March 28, 1988) suggests that California would save $90 million per year if it were to abolish the death penalty.

    $78 million of these expenses are occurred at the trial level and would not be reduced by shortening appeals.

Source:
"CLOSING DEATH ROW WOULD SAVE STATE $90 MILLION A YEAR", Sacramento Bee, Published on March 28, 1988, Page A1, 2589 words. Read the article.
#12 - 02-11-2011, 17:38 uur
« Laatst bewerkt op: 02-11-2011, 17:42 uur door Johan »

Pieter79

MSNBC is mij teveel richting de democrats, en past dus niet bij mij.

Wat misschien niet helemaal goed naar voren is gekomen in mijn vorige stukje is dat ik het erg vreemd vind dat de doodstraf duurder moet zijn. Met de nadruk op 'MOET'. Naar mijn mening kan en mag iedereen een gelijk aantal kansen op een appeal hebben waarbij naar de schuldvraag gekeken wordt. De uiteindelijke sentence is dan life in prison of death penalty. In beide gevallen zouden dan ook gelijke en evenveel kansen op een beroep mogelijk moeten zijn. Waarom wordt er minder 'zorgvuldig' of minder geld in een life in prison zaak gestoken? Dat is de reden dat ik het bullshit vind dat de deathpenalty de maatschappij meer zou moeten kosten dan een life in prison. In de echte wereld is het blijkbaar dat iemand met de doodstraf meer kansen of advocaten krijgt, of wat dan ook.

Vandaar dat ik aangaf dat het systeem dan op de schop mag. Buiten het feit dat het ene of andere misschien duurder zal me trouwens ook worst wezen. Helaas zijn er parasieten die de maatschappij erg veel geld kosten, en dat is ons probleem. Ik heb er ddan ook absoluut geen probleem mee dat deze beesten opgeruimd worden. Al is het maar om te besparen op resources (eten op tafel, extra electriciteit om de airco te draaien enz.).

Dat is hoe ik er over denk. Je hoeft het er niet mee eens te zijn, maar dat houdt het spannend hier op het forum!

Gr. Pieter
#13 - 02-11-2011, 23:12 uur
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."
Inventor ***7 Patents Granted*** (Update Jul-2019)

Johan

Hihihihi, de grootste parasieten zitten niet in de bak maar lopen er nog steeds buiten en de grootste misbruikers van resources zitten ook al niet in de bak ;-)

Cynisch maar wel waar.............

En nee we hoeven het (gelukkig) niet met elkaar eens te zijn alhoewel we niet eens zo veel van mening verschillen ;-)

Wat iedere burger eens zou moeten doen is een paar daagjes meedraaien in een bajes, helaas niet mogelijk maar zou wel goed zijn.
#14 - 03-11-2011, 04:04 uur

thieske

Het is triest dat we met de mensheid nog niet zo ver zijn dat we capital punishment nog noodzakelijk vinden en dat er ook nog voldoende mensen rondlopen die een wokkel in hun hoofd hebben waardoor ze in aanmerking komen voor dit soort straffen. Ik vind het een bijzonder akelig idee dat men over een drempel heen stapt en zegt "mja dan spuiten we die figuren toch tussen zes planken in".

Ik ben namelijk redelijk cynisch naar het rechtssysteem in Nederland. Ooit eens vervolgd voor iets wat ik niet gedaan heb (iemand anders pleegde vandalisme ik stond er met mijn rug naar toe, tien meter verderop) en werd in eerste instantie schuldig bevonden onder het mom "je was er bij, je bent er bij." en vervolgens in hoger beroep vrij gesproken omdat ik helemaal niets met de vandaal te maken had. Probleem in dit hele verhaal is dat men op basis van verdenkingen gehandeld heeft en niet op basis van bewijs. Het systeem , ook in Amerika , is een waar mensen fouten kunnen maken of verkeerde inschattingen. En ik probeer nu overigens die Troy Davis absoluut niet vrij te praten omdat er een aantal mensen nu twijfel aan het zaaien zijn. Als hij schuldig is en dat gewoon bewezen is op basis van feiten dan mag ie van mij in een kamertje zitten totdat ie oud wordt.

Ik heb liever een levende onschuldige terug dan iemand postuum onschuldig te verklaren. Dat is ook een beetje mosterd na de maaltijd. Desalniettemin moeten mensen die zich echt schuldig maken aan iets, gewoon boeten voor wat ze gedaan hebben.

Overigens begrijp ik wel dat men deze personen parasieten noemt, ze kosten immers geld... Maar de keerzijde is dat de mensen die in de gevangenissen werken ook gezinnen hebben die moeten eten. Ieder nadeel heeft dus ook zijn """voordeel""". Mensen moeten immers blijven werken, heel erg zonde dat dit ten koste moet gaan van het schuim der aarde.
#15 - 03-11-2011, 08:04 uur
« Laatst bewerkt op: 03-11-2011, 08:46 uur door thieske »
For Boston, For Boston, We sing our proud refrain

leden:

0 leden en 1 gast bekijken dit topic.


Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15